News & Events

NEPCon's Sourcing Legal Timber 2.0 Conference | 15 March 2018 | Woking

On Thursday 15th March, NEPCon will hold a conference entitled 'Sourcing Legal Timber 2.0' at the The Living Planet Centre, Woking, Surrey.

"It’s been almost five years since the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR) came into force and things are looking quite different to how they did then. Enforcement authorities are stepping up their game all over Europe, a lot of new information and tools are available from all kinds of sources and FLEGT licensed timber is now available on the market," explain the organisers.

"Nonetheless, living up to the EUTR requirements is still a challenge for companies across Europe. Therefore NEPCon would like to offer the industry, authorities as well as other stakeholders the opportunity to participate in a free international conference on 15th of March near London."

The event is designed to shed light on a wide set of key issues in the Timber Trade Industry such as:

  • avoid common due diligence pitfalls
  • gain access to insights on key risks and how to deal with them
  • understand how the enforcement authorities evaluate your performance
  • understand how conducting quality due diligence makes good business sense
  • communicate about FLEGT-licensed timber
  • promote companies' compliance
  • gain an overview of the vast jungle of free info and tools available and how to use them
  • plan for future sourcing
  • understand how technological advances in timber traceability and verification can help improve the efficiency and credibility of due diligence systems
  • connect and exchange experiences with timber-related companies, trade associations, technical experts and relevant organisations from across Europe

To register for the event, complete the online form here.

For any queries, you can contact Ann Weddle on aw@nepcon.org or +44 7491 812337.

View the event on CTI Industry Calendar.

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/nepcons-sourcing-legal-timber-20-conference-15-march-2018-woking]

TTJ Editor Sally Spencer awarded Woodland Hero 2017

Grown in Britain has presented its annual Woodland Hero award to Sally Spencer, Contributing Editor on Timber Trades Journal (TTJ), at a gathering in London.

Throughout her time on Timber Trades Journal (TTJ), the business magazine for the timber trading and timber-using sectors, Sally has taken an interest in British-grown timber.

Frequently writing lead articles and interviews for TTJ’s annual British timber features, Sally has become well-known across Grown in Britain’s constituency of British timber growers, producers and distributors.

Presenting Sally Spencer with her award at a gathering kindly hosted at Timber Trades Journal’s London offices, Grown in Britain CEO Dougal Driver said: “Sally very much deserves our 2017 Woodland Hero award. Her consistent coverage of British timber in a market dominated by imports has kept the faith on home-grown wood. Her reporting of developments in processing have also helped to underline the quality of today’s British timber.”

Steve Cook, chairman of Grown in Britain, added: “The Grown in Britain Woodland Hero award is given to people whose contribution, whether in public or behind the scenes, have benefitted wood that is Grown in Britain. Sally’s professional journalistic scrutiny of home-grown timber, and her enthusiasm for its coverage, have been of great benefit to British-grown wood.”

Accepting the award, TTJ’s Sally Spencer said: “I’ve developed good relationships and interviewed many key players in the British timber sector over time. As investment in the industry, and its share of the market, have grown, it has more than justified its place in TTJ. I enjoy following its progress and engaging with its people, and I’m honoured to receive this award from Grown in Britain.”

 

[News URL: http://www.cti-timber.org/content/ttj-editor-sally-spencer-awarded-woodland-hero-2017]

CTI Blog - Offsite timber construction has a major role to play in tackling UK Housing Crisis

This blog post is by Andrew Carpenter, Chief Executive of the Structural Timber Association (STA) and Member of the CTI Board of Directors.

 

Through discussion, debate and demonstration, the Government appears to have made the connection between construction and manufacturing and we have foreseen great potentialities within the ‘Industrial Strategy’ for offsite construction to play a significant part in delivering more homes to meet the shortfall in housing stock.

The Confederation of Timber Industries and the STA firmly believe that offsite timber construction is a great opportunity to reach the specified target of one million homes by 2020. With four out of five new homes in Scotland built using structural timber together with much of the housing volume in Canada, the US and Europe – we know that offsite timber solutions deliver.

In the main it will address many Government concerns associated with public procurement of housing including speed of build, environmental impact, lifetime energy efficiency and cost performance. These factors are not only of benefit to Government plans but to the wider construction industry. Cost savings, speed of build, faster return on capital outlay, reduction in waste, improved health and safety - are just some of the benefits of offsite timber construction. Add to this the unrivalled capacity and availability of materials within a robust supply chain combined with a sector that is quick to respond and it’s a clear choice.

Innovation in the structural timber product range has broadened the appeal, driven by intelligent and integrated construction solutions. We can demonstrate how easy, practical and efficiently projects can be completed, having a direct impact on transforming communities, while conveying the dynamic and fast-moving pace of the sector and the excitement that can be engendered when delivering innovative construction methods. 

UK manufacturers of structural timber components have a major role to play. We are geared for capacity, have the skills and materials to respond quickly and the experience to create a world-class offsite manufacturing sector in the UK. Current capacity is typically run on a single day shift only, making increases in output by multi-shifting relatively easy to do. Assuming full year outputs the sector can deliver around 150,000 units in 2020/2021, up from around 80,000 in 2017/2018.

I’ve never known such unified agreement that offsite construction is the solution - there is acceptance at pretty much every Government level, national, regional and local, that offsite is what is needed. The time is right for the construction industry to embrace innovative offsite timber technology and develop better buildings at a rapid rate to meet Government targets, to overcome the shortfall in housing stock, while delivering energy efficient buildings in a cost-effective quality manner.

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/cti-blog-offsite-timber-construction-has-major-role-play]

CIT Blog - Keeping reputation through responsible sourcing

This blog post is by TTF Managing Director and Member of CTI Board of Directors David Hopkins. It originally featured in the CTI Newsletter Winter 2017-18.

 

The recent legal cases concerning breaches of the European Timber Regulation (EUTR), in the UK and in Holland, are a stark reminder of the timber sector’s obligations in moral and legal terms. The two cases involved companies at different points of the supply chain, with differing cases against them, and markedly differing levels of punishment.

The first involved high street furniture chain Lombok. It was charged with not having conducted sufficient due diligence over the importation of a single item of furniture – a sideboard from India. There was no allegation that the item itself contained illegally harvested material. The charge was simply that insufficient due diligence had been conducted to confidently state it was of “negligible risk” – a clear legal requirement before placing goods on the market.

The second case, in Holland, did involve illegally harvested material. The Dutch authorities have ruled that Boogaerdt Hout placed illegally sourced teak from Myanmar onto the market. The company has been given two months to clear the material out of its supply chain or face fines of EUR20,000 per cubic metre. This follows a similar case in Sweden last year concerning Teak from Myanmar.

Both show the importance of conducting strict due diligence throughout timber supply chains. Without this in place how can one safely say there is, or is not, “negligible risk” to the materials we place on the market.

If we cannot say there is negligible risk, then we cannot say the timber we are selling is safe, and the reputation of the entire timber sector is called into question. In the minds of much of the public all timber is the same. Even Kevin McCloud made this mistake with his comments at UK Construction Week, despite the construction sector largely being served by certified European timber.

The real crime here though is that, as 21st century business regulation goes, compliance with the EUTR is relatively straightforward. It is a flexible, business friendly approach which allows companies to make their own judgements on their own supply chains. It doesn’t prevent trade, it enables it on a level playing field basis.

It’s why we are lobbying the Government to maintain the EUTR post-Brexit, and through the CTI’s All Party Parliamentary Group on Timber Industries, have got several politicians to ask questions in the house confirming the government’s future commitment.

We want to keep the reputation of the timber sector very high. The way to do that is to engage fully with the process of due diligence, make it simple and effective and be proud to demonstrate and articulate what we’re doing. The TTF will be reviewing its own Responsible Purchasing Policy (RPP) processes and mechanisms again in 2018 and working with Government and the Timber Industries APPG to ensure that regulation is something that we help design ourselves, rather than something which is imposed.

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/cit-blog-keeping-reputation-through-responsible-sourcing]

CTI Blog - The Timber Skills Funnel: Unlocking potential

This blog post is by BWF Chief Executive and Member of CTI Board of Directors Iain McIlwee. It originally featured in the CTI Newsletter Winter 2017-18.

 

Currently a third of construction apprenticeships are employed in the wood trades, but this is just the tip of the iceberg for timber. The opportunities to work in the timber sector are manifold, currently employing 350,000 people, the £10 billion integrated supply chain is actively engaging talent in developing pre-manufactured buildings and components for construction, seeking foresters to support our vibrant forestry sector, creating new roles to support digitalisation and logistics in the complex and evolving supply chain, employing ever more engineers, technicians and product designers to support our modern manufacturing units and requires high-level craftsmen to produce bespoke furniture or deliver complex restoration work fundamental to preserving our heritage. Whilst we remain optimistic about the future, we have some fundamental concerns about the education and training landscape

The Confederation of Timber Industries through the Wood Industry Training Group is looking to ensure that these opportunities are communicated and the infrastructure in place to support sector growth. At the top of the skills funnel (attracting people into the industry), the Makeit Wood Campaign is an exciting initiative, reaching into schools across the UK. This educational program fits into the Design and Technology curriculum in years 9-12. We have plans to scale this work up, however have concerns that Design and Technology is a subject in decline

Despite being a practical subject that engenders a vital understanding of our manufacturing industries and the fundamentals of product design, skills so critical to any industrial strategy, it is seen as somehow less important than the more academic sciences.  he decline in GCSE entries in this subject (from 440,000 in 2004 to just 185,279 in the last academic year) is a real concern for the UK industrial sector. Teacher recruitment in this discipline is also at an all-time low (less than 50% of the target DfE set in 2016) making the subject unviable in an increasing number of schools. As part of any overhaul of the Technical Routes for education Design and Technology should have equal status with the sciences on the National Curriculum. 

As an industry, we are optimistic that the Apprenticeship Levy and resulting reforms provide greater flexibility and suitable incentive to deliver positive change. In readiness we have developed new Apprenticeship Standards covering manufacturing, processing and furniture production and we welcome the control that these standards hand back to the employers, however, the process needs urgent attention. It is taking too long to develop new standards and the goal-posts set by the Institute of Apprenticeships seem to be a moving target.  Delivery is also a challenge, with FE Colleges under increasing financial pressure and limited support for the capital investment and additional space required to offer many of our courses. 

The timber industry is working hard to support these vital institutions through the BWF Centres of Excellence initiative. As we develop ever closer relationships it is clear that more needs to be done to address the inherent competition between schools and FE Colleges.  Developing a focus for Technical Qualifications through a UCAS equivalent system is also a priority that should focus on post 16 learners and ensure that all training and apprenticeship opportunities are presented to all students without prejudice. This process should also support a “clearing” system to minimise wastage, recycle opportunity and support informed choice. Every effort must be taken to ensure that the Technical Routes are not seen as the lesser option.

Higher level apprenticeships and the traditional academic routes also have a strong role to play to support innovation and the implementation of cutting-edge technology and as a consequence similar initiatives are being set up with Universities across the UK. The timber industry needs a constant flow of graduates in disciplines such as wood science, product design engineering, process engineering, mechanical and materials engineering as well as business, IT and logistical focussed subjects to support the digitalisation and ‘service-ification’ of manufacturing and construction. It is for this reason that the CTI and our respective Trade Bodies are working with Universities around the UK and exploring the opportunity of setting up an Innovation Council to better support innovation through collaborative networks across the UK.  

Timber is very much seen as the emerging material of the 21st Century with huge global potential. If we want that the UK economy is well placed to benefit from the clear obvious opportunities that timber offers to develop - from forest through to factory a profitable supply chain capable of delivering to support the UK economic and sustainable targets - it is critical that we continue to work to ensure that schools, colleges and universities are engaged with our industry.

This means collaborating to develop our rising into work ready pioneers that can help to support the UK in building a modern and sustainable and world-leading industrial sector, capable of harnessing digitalisation, leading manufacturing 4.0 and ensuring the timber industry is a jewel in the UK industrial crown. 

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/cti-blog-timber-skills-funnel-unlocking-potential]

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