News & Events

The Montréal Wood Convention: the wood trade event in Canada | 19-22 March 2019 | Montréal, Canada

The Montréal Wood Convention 2019 will take place March 19-22 at Fairmont The Queen Elizabeth hotel in Montréal, Canada.

In early 2019, registrations are brisk and indicate a total participation in excess of 1,000 people, above the numbers seen in 2018. The 113 booths in the exhibit hall are almost booked.

“The Convention is really the trade event to be where all North-American wood manufacturers and buyers can meet in the same place at the same time. Participants can attend industry seminars on economy and wood markets, visit the exhibit hall, hear a keynote speaker and network”, says the manager of the event, Sven Gustavsson, from the Quebec Wood Export Bureau, one of the four organizing industry associations.

The other organizers are the Québec Forest Industry Council, the Ontario Forest Industries Association and the Maritime Lumber Bureau.

For program and registration: www.montrealwoodconvention.com.

View the event on the CTI Industry Calendar.

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/montr%C3%A9al-wood-convention-wood-trade-event-canada-19-22-march-2019-montr%C3%A9al-canada]

WPA Making the Most of Wood Conference 2019 | 11 April 2019 | Warwickshire

The WPA’s Making the Most of Wood Conference 2019 gets right to the heart of the big issues that will shape future demand for industrial wood protection processes and products.

The event, organised by the Wood Protection Association (WPA), will take place at the Forest of Arden Hotel, Warwickshire, on Thursday 11th April 2019.

David Hopkins, Managing Director of the Timber Trades Federation (TTF) will talk about how TTF has put building confidence in preservative treated wood at the top of its agenda and the strategy it is pursuing in collaboration with WPA to make this happen; WPA’s CEO Gordon Ewbank will follow this with further details about the part WPA is playing in this strategic partnership, including news about the association’s quality schemes for both preservative and flame retardant treated wood.

After the mid-morning break, BRE’s authority on sustainable development, Dr Ed Suttie, will set out the latest thinking on the role of wood in meeting a growing demand for healthy buildings and the implications for the treated wood sector.

Finally, whilst CLT is seen as something of a flagship product for the timber in construction sector worldwide, questions about its long-term durability are now surfacing. Elisabeth Piveteau-Boley of Piveteaubois, will talk about the manufacture of preservative pre-treated CLT panels for applications where enhanced confidence in durability is required.

Conference will conclude with wood industry communications expert Liz Male MBE tackling our speakers about the big issues and opportunities that face the wood protection sector and inviting audience questions. Here is the full conference programme:

  • 09.25 – Opening welcome
  • 09.30 – Building confidence in preservative treated wood – Dave Hopkins, MD TTF
  • 10.00 – WPA Benchmark QA & Product Approval Schemes – Gordon Ewbank: – providing UK wood treaters with the means to raise quality; – interlocking quality schemes build confidence in FR treated materials
  • 10.30 – Networking break – refreshments
  • 11.15 – Healthy buildings and wood – Ed Suttie, BRE
  • 11.45 – CLT construction is good – durable CLT is better! – Elisabeth Piveteau-Boley
  • 12.15 – Question time – Liz Male tackles our speakers on the challenges and opportunities for the wood protection industry
  • 13.00 – Lunch in the restaurant. Depart after lunch

WPA has negotiated a special rate for delegates attending the Annual WPA Awards event and Conference of £199.00 + VAT. This covers the Awards reception and dinner, bed, breakfast, lunch and conference refreshments.

Conference attendance only: WPA Members £50.00 + VAT   Non-Members: £150 + VAT

To book your place contact Caroline Hewison

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/wpa-making-most-wood-conference-2019-11-april-2019-warwickshire]

PEFC sponsors Responsible Timber CPD at Surface Design Show 2019

PEFC UK will be hosting a Responsible Timber Sourcing CPD PEFC at the Surface Design Show 2019 in London on Wednesday 6 February. The fully accredited CPD is open to architects, specifiers and contractors and certificates of attendance will be awarded.

The CPD module will be presented by Charlie Law, Managing Director of Sustainable Construction Solutions, who has worked in the construction sector for over 30 years, and has extensive industry knowledge having worked for BAM, Kier and Lendlease. Charlie is also a Director at the Timber Research and Development Association (TRADA), a member of the Grown in Britain Executive and a member of the Ska technical committee.

The CPD workshop will provide:
• The background to forest certification and its global importance
• The UK timber market and drivers for certified timber
• The requirements of the UK government’s timber procurement policy 
• What a model timber specification clause looks like
• Chain of Custody certification and how it works.

Using timber from well-managed forests that meet internationally recognised standards of legality and sustainability, certified by organisations such as PEFC is a pre-requisite for environmental assessment schemes such as BREEAM, LEED and Ska, as well as many others around the world. Green building standards, together with corporate responsible sourcing policies, are increasingly driving demand for responsibly-sourced timber. To meet client expectations, it is therefore important that designers and specifiers insist on certified timber for their projects, along with full Chain of Custody. 

The seminar take place at the Surface Design Show CPD Hub on Wednesday 6 February at 2.30pm and CPD certificates will be awarded: www.surfacedesignshow.com/sessions-cpd-hub 
The Surface Design Show takes place 5-7 February 2019 at the Business Design Centre, London. To register and for more information visit: https://sds19-visitor.reg.buzz/website

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/pefc-sponsors-responsible-timber-cpd-surface-design-show-2019]

Proper management of tropical forests could be an asset for the planet, says ATIBT

On the first anniversary of its Fair&Precious brand, the International Tropical Timber Technical Association (ATIBT) underlines some of the lesser-known facts about forest management while remaining committed to promoting a sustainable tropical timber industry.

Sustainable forest management protects against deforestation

When we talk about the exploitation of tropical forests, many people associate it with deforestation. They imagine thousands of hectares of virgin forests destroyed, century-old trees burned to the ground and nature disfigured forever – all for the sole purpose of creating agricultural land or grazing to obtain land. Yet there is a major difference between deforestation and sustainable forest management.

Robert Hunink, President of ATIBT explains: “European consumers misunderstand the role of forest managers in attributing tropical deforestation, mainly due to the "mining" of forest soil fertility for agriculture or firewood. Through the Fair&Precious brand, they will learn that the actors of our ecosystem do not plunder, but on the contrary only pick one or two trees per hectare, on the same plot, once every thirty years."

To date, only companies certified in legal and sustainable forest management (certifications are issued by FSC or PEFC and controlled by certifying bodies such as Bureau Veritas, SGS Quailfor or Rainforest Alliance) can benefit from the Fair&Precious brand. In addition to these certification standards, they must comply with the country’s applicable forest code (after validation of control procedures and obtaining legal certifications). The certification is then valid for a period of five years.

The ratio of trees harvested is far lower than those left to grow naturally

At present, the vast majority of tropical timber comes directly from the virgin forest (without harvesting control) or from large plantations which are gradually replacing virgin forests. The first is simply illegal poaching, while the second is a monoculture of exotic tree varieties that degrade the soil, threaten biodiversity and accelerate climate change. 

The Fair&Precious programme offers a sustainable alternative: preserving forest resources by harvesting less than its natural increase. Young trees, as well as seed trees, are systematically left standing, since they contribute to the renewal of the forest.

Forest managers create real local economic and social development

Unlike many unscrupulous players, Fair&Precious members are committed to working for local economic and social development by contributing to generate income for people and by providing them with access to services such as education, medical care and housing. Local processing is thus favoured and training in various forestry and wood trades is provided by the network’s member concession holders. By providing employment and resources to local populations, they are fighting against exodus and urban concentration.

The mission of forest managers is also to fight poaching

With its sustainable approach, the Fair&Precious brand also aims to protect fauna and flora, by ensuring that animals’ habitats are made safe. In blocking the illegal trafficking of forest products, they are also able to develop programmes to combat poaching and restock endangered species.

Tropical wood is in fact the most environmentally friendly material available

Today, in the absence of a guarantee, consumers often turn away from tropical wood and choose materials with a much lower environmental performance record. Fair&Precious aims to restore confidence among tropical wood users and to promote the acquisition of products from sustainably managed tropical forests. The exceptional technical performance of tropical woods and their durability properties are highlighted. Indeed, these materials have excellent resistance to external environmental factors and require no chemical treatment. 

Tropical wood is particularly useful and efficient in the construction of garden decking, interior and exterior furniture, shipbuilding, etc. Fair&Precious’ objective is not to massively increase volume sales, given its commitment to preserving the forests, but to enable these “precious" woods to regain their true place on the market. 

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/proper-management-tropical-forests-could-be-asset-planet-says-atibt]

TRADA’s response to the Government’s proposed ban which has implications for CLT

Cross-laminated timber (CLT) and other forms of structural timber construction are not only here to stay but are actually set to increase in popularity. After all, CLT attracts architects, contractors, clients and more for a multitude of distinct reasons. Some are aesthetic, others include cost reduction and programme savings – and, for those concerned about climate change, CLT sequesters carbon and stores it for the life of the building.

For these reasons TRADA believes that, whilst its understanding of the Government’s conclusion to the consultation suggests that CLT will therefore be prevented from being used in certain situations, this does not have to be of detriment to the structural timber market. The vast majority of CLT projects delivered in the UK to date are six-storeys and under – which will not be impacted upon by these restrictions. Important markets currently utilising the material, such as schools, will therefore remain unaffected.

What this proposed ban does mean, however, is a necessity for creativity if we are to continue making the best use of timber as a structural material. We must, as an industry, determine methods by which we can build above six-storeys using structural timber – but not on the outer walls. Glulam post and beam is already one potential solution to this challenge.

The Government’s report remains fairly vague as to the use of BS 8414 as a method of proving compliance. TRADA will therefore seek to establish the exact situation with regards to this.

In general, TRADA believes that the consultation was ambiguously worded, particularly in regards to whether the consultation questions related to cladding only or to the entire wall assembly. Due to this, we found it very difficult to know how to answer many of the questions – and we believe this ambiguity will have caused difficulty for others too.

Read the document Government Response to the Consultation on Banning the Use of Combustible Materials in the External Walls of High-Rise Residential Buildings here

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/trada%E2%80%99s-response-government%E2%80%99s-proposed-ban-which-has-implications-clt]

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