News & Events

CTI responds to Government's Clean Growth Strategy remarking the contribution of Timber Industry to low-carbon economy

The Confederation of Timber Industries (CTI) has recently produced a brief response to the Clean Growth Strategy policy paper released by the UK Government last Autumn.

The CTI's response highlights the benefits that the UK Timber Industry can bring to a new, long-lasting, low-carbon economy model.

In fact, Timber has an established supply chain with huge potential for rapid growth, helping the UK meet employment, economic and housing targets, whilst also delivering against low-carbon and climate change objectives:

  • Timber is one of the safest and cheapest forms of carbon capture and storage available
  • The UK timber industry employs 150,000 people in the manufacturing and supply chain and an additional 200,000 UK construction jobs (and a third of construction apprenticeships) are in wood related trades
  • The forestry and timber industry is a key part of our environmental and industrial heritage and a vital part of our low-carbon future
  • Timber products have the lowest embodied carbon of any mainstream building material
  • Timber product manufacturing has significant potential to reduce the Emissions Intensity Ratio (EIR)

The response - freely downloadable here - is structured in 6 key areas providing useful data and insights on relevant themes such as timber in costruction, forestry, carbon storage, production processes and so on.

For any comments or suggestions, please send an email to [email protected]

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/cti-responds-governments-clean-growth-strategy-remarking-contribution-timber-industry-low]

NEPCon's Sourcing Legal Timber 2.0 Conference | 15 March 2018 | Woking

On Thursday 15th March, NEPCon will hold a conference entitled 'Sourcing Legal Timber 2.0' at the The Living Planet Centre, Woking, Surrey.

"It’s been almost five years since the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR) came into force and things are looking quite different to how they did then. Enforcement authorities are stepping up their game all over Europe, a lot of new information and tools are available from all kinds of sources and FLEGT licensed timber is now available on the market," explain the organisers.

"Nonetheless, living up to the EUTR requirements is still a challenge for companies across Europe. Therefore NEPCon would like to offer the industry, authorities as well as other stakeholders the opportunity to participate in a free international conference on 15th of March near London."

The event is designed to shed light on a wide set of key issues in the Timber Trade Industry such as:

  • avoid common due diligence pitfalls
  • gain access to insights on key risks and how to deal with them
  • understand how the enforcement authorities evaluate your performance
  • understand how conducting quality due diligence makes good business sense
  • communicate about FLEGT-licensed timber
  • promote companies' compliance
  • gain an overview of the vast jungle of free info and tools available and how to use them
  • plan for future sourcing
  • understand how technological advances in timber traceability and verification can help improve the efficiency and credibility of due diligence systems
  • connect and exchange experiences with timber-related companies, trade associations, technical experts and relevant organisations from across Europe

To register for the event, complete the online form here.

For any queries, you can contact Ann Weddle on [email protected] or +44 7491 812337.

View the event on CTI Industry Calendar.

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/nepcons-sourcing-legal-timber-20-conference-15-march-2018-woking]

TTJ Editor Sally Spencer awarded Woodland Hero 2017

Grown in Britain has presented its annual Woodland Hero award to Sally Spencer, Contributing Editor on Timber Trades Journal (TTJ), at a gathering in London.

Throughout her time on Timber Trades Journal (TTJ), the business magazine for the timber trading and timber-using sectors, Sally has taken an interest in British-grown timber.

Frequently writing lead articles and interviews for TTJ’s annual British timber features, Sally has become well-known across Grown in Britain’s constituency of British timber growers, producers and distributors.

Presenting Sally Spencer with her award at a gathering kindly hosted at Timber Trades Journal’s London offices, Grown in Britain CEO Dougal Driver said: “Sally very much deserves our 2017 Woodland Hero award. Her consistent coverage of British timber in a market dominated by imports has kept the faith on home-grown wood. Her reporting of developments in processing have also helped to underline the quality of today’s British timber.”

Steve Cook, chairman of Grown in Britain, added: “The Grown in Britain Woodland Hero award is given to people whose contribution, whether in public or behind the scenes, have benefitted wood that is Grown in Britain. Sally’s professional journalistic scrutiny of home-grown timber, and her enthusiasm for its coverage, have been of great benefit to British-grown wood.”

Accepting the award, TTJ’s Sally Spencer said: “I’ve developed good relationships and interviewed many key players in the British timber sector over time. As investment in the industry, and its share of the market, have grown, it has more than justified its place in TTJ. I enjoy following its progress and engaging with its people, and I’m honoured to receive this award from Grown in Britain.”

 

[News URL: http://www.cti-timber.org/content/ttj-editor-sally-spencer-awarded-woodland-hero-2017]

CTI Blog - Offsite timber construction has a major role to play in tackling UK Housing Crisis

This blog post is by Andrew Carpenter, Chief Executive of the Structural Timber Association (STA) and Member of the CTI Board of Directors.

 

Through discussion, debate and demonstration, the Government appears to have made the connection between construction and manufacturing and we have foreseen great potentialities within the ‘Industrial Strategy’ for offsite construction to play a significant part in delivering more homes to meet the shortfall in housing stock.

The Confederation of Timber Industries and the STA firmly believe that offsite timber construction is a great opportunity to reach the specified target of one million homes by 2020. With four out of five new homes in Scotland built using structural timber together with much of the housing volume in Canada, the US and Europe – we know that offsite timber solutions deliver.

In the main it will address many Government concerns associated with public procurement of housing including speed of build, environmental impact, lifetime energy efficiency and cost performance. These factors are not only of benefit to Government plans but to the wider construction industry. Cost savings, speed of build, faster return on capital outlay, reduction in waste, improved health and safety - are just some of the benefits of offsite timber construction. Add to this the unrivalled capacity and availability of materials within a robust supply chain combined with a sector that is quick to respond and it’s a clear choice.

Innovation in the structural timber product range has broadened the appeal, driven by intelligent and integrated construction solutions. We can demonstrate how easy, practical and efficiently projects can be completed, having a direct impact on transforming communities, while conveying the dynamic and fast-moving pace of the sector and the excitement that can be engendered when delivering innovative construction methods. 

UK manufacturers of structural timber components have a major role to play. We are geared for capacity, have the skills and materials to respond quickly and the experience to create a world-class offsite manufacturing sector in the UK. Current capacity is typically run on a single day shift only, making increases in output by multi-shifting relatively easy to do. Assuming full year outputs the sector can deliver around 150,000 units in 2020/2021, up from around 80,000 in 2017/2018.

I’ve never known such unified agreement that offsite construction is the solution - there is acceptance at pretty much every Government level, national, regional and local, that offsite is what is needed. The time is right for the construction industry to embrace innovative offsite timber technology and develop better buildings at a rapid rate to meet Government targets, to overcome the shortfall in housing stock, while delivering energy efficient buildings in a cost-effective quality manner.

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/cti-blog-offsite-timber-construction-has-major-role-play]

CIT Blog - Keeping reputation through responsible sourcing

This blog post is by TTF Managing Director and Member of CTI Board of Directors David Hopkins. It originally featured in the CTI Newsletter Winter 2017-18.

 

The recent legal cases concerning breaches of the European Timber Regulation (EUTR), in the UK and in Holland, are a stark reminder of the timber sector’s obligations in moral and legal terms. The two cases involved companies at different points of the supply chain, with differing cases against them, and markedly differing levels of punishment.

The first involved high street furniture chain Lombok. It was charged with not having conducted sufficient due diligence over the importation of a single item of furniture – a sideboard from India. There was no allegation that the item itself contained illegally harvested material. The charge was simply that insufficient due diligence had been conducted to confidently state it was of “negligible risk” – a clear legal requirement before placing goods on the market.

The second case, in Holland, did involve illegally harvested material. The Dutch authorities have ruled that Boogaerdt Hout placed illegally sourced teak from Myanmar onto the market. The company has been given two months to clear the material out of its supply chain or face fines of EUR20,000 per cubic metre. This follows a similar case in Sweden last year concerning Teak from Myanmar.

Both show the importance of conducting strict due diligence throughout timber supply chains. Without this in place how can one safely say there is, or is not, “negligible risk” to the materials we place on the market.

If we cannot say there is negligible risk, then we cannot say the timber we are selling is safe, and the reputation of the entire timber sector is called into question. In the minds of much of the public all timber is the same. Even Kevin McCloud made this mistake with his comments at UK Construction Week, despite the construction sector largely being served by certified European timber.

The real crime here though is that, as 21st century business regulation goes, compliance with the EUTR is relatively straightforward. It is a flexible, business friendly approach which allows companies to make their own judgements on their own supply chains. It doesn’t prevent trade, it enables it on a level playing field basis.

It’s why we are lobbying the Government to maintain the EUTR post-Brexit, and through the CTI’s All Party Parliamentary Group on Timber Industries, have got several politicians to ask questions in the house confirming the government’s future commitment.

We want to keep the reputation of the timber sector very high. The way to do that is to engage fully with the process of due diligence, make it simple and effective and be proud to demonstrate and articulate what we’re doing. The TTF will be reviewing its own Responsible Purchasing Policy (RPP) processes and mechanisms again in 2018 and working with Government and the Timber Industries APPG to ensure that regulation is something that we help design ourselves, rather than something which is imposed.

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/cit-blog-keeping-reputation-through-responsible-sourcing]

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