Industry News

World's tallest timber building 'HoHo Tower' is taking shape in Vienna

Construction of the new 84-meter, 24-storey high 'HoHo Tower' in Vienna, Austria - set to be the world's tallest timber building - has been underway for over a year now.

The lower of the two structures is complete (click on the picture to expland) and installation of the initial prefabricated wooden elements is in full progress.

Around 76 percent of the structure will be constructed from wood. Once finished, Hoho Wien will house a hotel, apartments, a restaurant, a wellness centre and offices.

All included, HoHo Vienna comprises five structures with between six and twenty-four floors. The shell construction of the basement extending under the entire development and that of the underground car park have been completed. The solid concrete core is now being built and timber installation is in full swing. Assembly work is scheduled to take one and a half weeks per floor.

The solid timber walls will never be distinguishable as such from the outside, since a moisture barrier will have been applied to each of the individual elements before they leave the factory to protect against weathering.

The tower that forms part of the HoHo Vienna project has one major strength: lots of building parts are prefabricated in the factory where weather conditions can be left out of account. As a result, numerous procedures are no longer necessary on the construction site itself. The HoHo Wien system, which is kept deliberately "simple", stacks up four prefabricated, serial building elements: supports, joist, ceiling panels and facade elements.

In a recent interview - available in full here - Caroline Palfy, Managing Director of the real estate developer Cetus Baudevelopment, illustrates the peculiarities of such a large-volume timber project.

"The preparations and construction with wood are a tricky business, since ready solutions are not forthcoming in all areas," explains Ms Palfy. "It's all about developing new things and using them – and that's what makes this project so exciting."

"I keep getting asked whether our timber resources are jeopardised by the current timber boom in the construction industry. In Austria, forests produce 30 million cubic metres of timber a year, of which 26 million cubic metres are logged. The remaining 4 million cubic metres remain in the forest, continually increasing timber stocks. In other words, 1 cubic metre of wood grows back every second and thus the timber used for the entire HoHo Vienna project will have grown back in our country's forests in only one hour and 17 minutes."

"True to the motto 'It's time to clock off and no one wants to go home', HoHo Vienna caters to all the wishes of a new generation of blue-collar workers, white-collar employees and self-employed. The office of the future breaks completely new ground. New features are brought into league with wood, a traditional material, creating a relaxed and homey atmosphere. That is precisely our vision."

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/worlds-tallest-timber-building-hoho-tower-taking-shape-vienna]

AHEC launches ‘Bostanlı Footbridge' project showcasing use of thermally-modified American ash

The American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) has launched a new case study showcasing the use thermally-modified American ash to create a new integrated coastal attraction in Izmir, Turkey.

The ‘Bostanlı Footbridge’ and ‘Bostanlı Sunset Lounge’ have been designed by Studio Evren Başbuğ Architects as part of the 'Karşıkıyı' concept created for the 'İzmirSea' coastal regeneration project. These two architectural installations, which are positioned in close proximity and in reference to each other, have generated a new, integrated coastal attraction, where the Bostanlı Creek flows into the bay, on a very special and unique spot due to the geometric form of the coastline. Opened in July 2016, the site has become one of the top public attractions in Karşıyaka, İzmir and has been embraced and visited by residents from all over the city.

The ‘Bostanlı Footbridge’, oriented in its unique position and providing a view of the bay on one side and the city on the other, has been designed with an asymmetrical cross-section. This special section is formed by several cascading thermally-modified American ash boards, produced and provided by Novawood, installed on a steel frame, allowing users to enjoy the view of the bay either sitting or sprawling. In this way, the bridge goes beyond being just an infrastructural urban element, solely used as a thoroughfare, and instead, serves as a public leisure and attraction piece in relation to its environment.

“Given that the site was so unique in terms of its location and geography, as designers we did not need any more inspiration from the outside. The 'Bostanlı Footbridge’ and 'Bostanlı Sunset Lounge’, both promise a new urban space to experience different forms of 'idleness', by employing the social, geographical and historical backgrounds of this unique location. These new coastal installations fit perfectly with the 'Easy Way of Living' vision established for the city of İzmir, by the 'İzmirSea' coastal regeneration project,” said Evren Başbuğ, Founding Partner, Studio Evren Başbuğ Architects.

“All the materials are open to the corrosive effects of salty sea water. Also as a Mediterranean city, İzmir has a relatively high percentage of sunny days, leaving the thermally-modified ash vulnerable to the ultraviolet sunlight. These conditions made us think twice at the design phase but we decided to give it a try. It has been almost a year since the opening, and we frequently visit the site to see if there is any significant material degrade, but the wood is performing well. Wood ages nicely,” added Başbug.

More details about the project are available here.

For the photo gallery, click here

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/ahec-launches-%E2%80%98bostanl%C4%B1-footbridge-project-showcasing-use-thermally-modified-american-ash]

Finland's tallest wooden building works set to start in spring

Construction of the The Lighthouse, the tallest wooden building in Finland, is scheduled to start in April-May 2017.

The 14-storey building - projected by Arcadia Architects Ltd - will be located close to the center of Joensuu in Carelia. It will provide 117 apartments. 

[Photo courtesy of www.arcadia.fi]

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/finlands-tallest-wooden-building-work-set-start-spring]

The Circular Building opens its doors to the public

On the occasion of the London Design Festival 2016, The Building Centre, Arup, The Built Environment Trust, Frener & Reifer and BAM have teamed up to create The Circular Building.

The installation - raised in front of The Building Centre in London and open to the public Monday - Saturday 10am - 5pm - intends to explore how we might apply circular economy principles to the design and construction of buildings.

The Circular Building offers a solid example of how we might:

- Lease rather than purchase materials and products

- Maximise off-site fabrication

- Select materials that can be re-used, remanufactured or recycled at end of life

- Choose mechanical and push-fit connections rather than adhesives to allow deconstruction

- Avoid wet trades

- Design fit-out to comprise interchangeable panels leased from suppliers

- Ventilation provided by prototype equipment made from recycled plastic, cardboard and re-manufactured drinks cans

- Electrical system is low voltage and off-grid, facilitating future flexibility and ease-of-maintenance

The installation is also accompanied by Circular Living - an exhibition exploring the impact of the circular economy in a range of industries, from fashion to product design- and by the conference 'Circular economy in the built environment' to take place on 21 September 2016.

Further information is available here.

 

[News URL: http://www.cti-timber.org/content/circular-building-opens-its-doors-public]

Innovative CLT tulipwood structure 'The Smile' to be unveiled at London Design Festival

The American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) has collaborated with Alison Brooks Architects, Arup and the London Design Festival to present a cross-laminated tulipwood structure, ‘The Smile’ at the Chelsea College of Art Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground from 17 September until 12 October.

The Smile is one of the Festival’s Landmark Projects, which can be inhabited and explored by the public. The spectacular, curved, tubular timber structure measures 3.5m high, 4.5m wide and 34m long and is effectively a beam curving up at both ends. Showcasing the structural and spatial potential of cross-laminated American tulipwood, Alison Brooks' concept is the first ever ‘mega-tube’ made with construction-sized panels of hardwood CLT.

The Smile is the first project in the world to use large hardwood CLT panels, in fact the entire structure is made from just 12 huge tulipwood panels, each up to 14m long and 4.5m wide. Fabricating these panels in a real CLT production plant has been an important step forward, showcasing how the material can be used for commercial projects.

Architect Alison Brooks said: "The Smile’s form itself is an invitation to test whether the pavilion moves, and how it feels to walk in on a curved floor. A single door and ramp from the square invites visitors to enter – something like our archetypal image of Noah’s Ark. Inside the door light spilling from the ends of the arc will invite you to walk up the slope of the curve to balconies at either end, rather like looking out from the rail of a ship."

For more infomation click here.

View the Gallery here.

 

[News URL: http://www.cti-timber.org/content/innovative-clt-tulipwood-structure-smile-be-unveiled-london-design-festival]

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