Treated construction timber no threat to indoor air quality, says BRE review

< See all news & events

Treated construction timber no threat to indoor air quality, says BRE review

Preservative treated timber is present in a range of construction products in our homes, including parts of the structural timber frame, window frames, tiling battens and in the roof structure. 

In mid-2017, the Wood Protection Association (WPA) commissioned the Building Research Establishment (BRE) to help understand how treated timber performs in the context of air quality within buildings.

The review considered industrially pre-treated wood products that have been impregnated with a wood preservative formulation in the context of a 2017 new build UK domestic construction.

BRE's research concluded that "the available scientific evidence suggests that emissions from preservative treated wood articles to air are small and further to that the complexity of the pathway from air within the building envelope/cavity to the indoor air compartment means that the concentration reaching indoor air is negligible. Thus, the evidence indicates preservative treated wood poses no threat to indoor air quality."

Since the BRE recommends considering further research and testing to add to the existing knowledge, the WPA has already made it known that more specific studies on the subject will be carried out.

A summary of the BRE report can be found here

 

[News URL: http://cti-timber.org/content/treated-construction-timber-no-threat-indoor-air-quality-says-bre-review]